Eric Olander is Speaker on a Live TV/Webcast November 7th, 2007 Washington, DC

Posted by on

Last week I spoke as an expert on a live webcast sponsored by Chem.info and Tectura on lot traceability using our ERP/MRP system for system recall on raw materials for chemical products.

EPi recently switched to Microsoft's Navision software process this March. One of the great benefits is the lot traceability feature that allows EPi to make a product recall happen in a matter of minutes vs. hours or days of a manual system. The new system through bar-coding allows no more manual entry eliminating input errors. With this new system, we can type a raw material lot number and learn what EPi products it was used in and who received those products in a timely fashion so that if we had to issue a recall we could do this very quickly instead of having to dig through piles of paper.

Another experience I want to share with you is what it took to go through the experience of doing a live web cast, which technically is a TV show on the internet. This was a live show so we all had a case of the butterflies before we did this. Lisa Arrigo from Chem.info did a great job as the moderator with that great smile, Joe Ackerman from Somca organization was our technical expert with all of his experience and Lori Pauly was the Tectura expert. A few weeks prior, we had a practice run on a teleconference call. We all got together for a wonderful dinner the night before. Then the next morning we hit the studio at Interface Media Group. It was a interesting company from the fact it does DC talk shows (we saw a lot of the sets), political ads and presidents. It also had shot the picture for Hillary Clinton's latest book and recently completed a PBS special on Armageddon. I turned orange. For the first time in my life I had makeup put on my face. Our makeup specialist who I can not remember his name has done all of the presidents since Carter and does Hollywood stars like Jodie Foster and Arnold Schwarzenegger. We did a practice run in a conference room then did a practice on the actual set. You know that set looks like an expensive piece of wood but it was only plastic laminate. There were three cameras on us, a control room, director and a crew of about five other camera people and set people. After the practice run, we had lunch and had our makeup put on which for the guys took about ten minutes and for the ladies 20-30 minutes. The live teleconference started at 2 pm eastern time, so we had to be ready by 1:30 pm for makeup, touch up and sound checks.

We started on time and it went well. I was the last presenter, but before it was my turn there was a technical problem with the screen above the camera that contained our outline of what we were talking about during Lori's presentation. She fortunately had her notes, but I did not. So I was starting to get concerned, especially on live TV, but the excellent crew came to the rescue and my notes were located above the TV camera as planned. After the presentation, we took questions from the people viewing the web cast. In all this took about one hour to do. I tell you there is lot of work that goes into doing this and my hats off to the Interface Media Group. This is a once in a life opportunity to do this and I want to say thanks to Tectura, Chem.info, and Microsoft giving me this opportunity.

Comments